The New Jersey State Federation of Women's Clubs of GFWC was founded in 1894 and founded the New Jersey College for Women in 1918 (now Douglass Residential Campus) The NJSFWC , the largest volunteer women's service organization in the state and a member of the General Federation of Womens Clubs, provides opportunities for education, leadership training and community service through participation in local clubs, enabling members to make a difference in the lives of others, one project at a time.

Please join us!

NJSFWC Headquarters
55 Labor Center Way
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
(732) 249-5474
http://www.njsfwc.org/

GFWC website:
http:/www.gfwc.org/

View all of our clubs in New Jersey:
www.njsfwc.org/index.php/article/index/5


Tuesday, April 21, 2015

GFWC Celebrates 125 Years!

On April 24, 2015, Federation Day, GFWC celebrates its 125th Anniversary. This year-long celebration of our organization’s impact and history is already in full swing and will culminate during the 2015 GFWC Annual Convention in Memphis, Tennessee in June. GFWC’s history is a rich and varied one. To that end, a series of 125 Facts for 125 Years was created, showcasing GFWC’s accomplishments and impact since our creation in 1890. (see www.gfwc.org for all 125 Facts)

In 1996 the United States Post Office awarded GFWC a 5-cent stamp in honor of its 75th anniversary. Although stamps don’t quite hold the same weight they once did, it was decided to produce a new design as part of our 125th anniversary celebration. We’ve come up with a striking, modern look that still echoes GFWC’s history and legacy. The deep red is taken from the GFWC color emblem. The rose, the official flower of GFWC is featured in the lower right. And GFWC’s new tagline, Living the Volunteer Spirit, is proudly displayed below the 125


Founded in 1890, GFWC’s roots can be traced back to 1868 when Jane Cunningham Croly, a professional journalist, attempted to attend a dinner at an all-male press club honoring British novelist Charles Dickens. Croly was denied admittance based upon her gender, and in response, formed a woman’s club—Sorosis. In celebration of Sorosis’ 21st anniversary in 1889, Jane Croly invited women’s clubs throughout the United States to pursue the cause of federation by attending a convention in New York City. On April 24, 1890, 63 clubs officially formed the General Federation of Women’s Club by ratifying the GFWC constitution.